How to type math equations and symbols on Rhea

To type in math symbols on Rhea, use latex code in between math tags as follows:
<math>Insert formula here</math> 

To view what to type in for math commands, hit Page| View Source, or Page| Edit. One example: $ f_1(t)=\int_3^t \sin (x) dx $. If you chose "Page, View Source", you would see <math>f_1(t)=\int_3^t \sin (x) dx</math>


Some examples

Some of the most common examples are listed below. To view a comprehensive list, check out some of these off-site links.

Basic text

Suppose that $ f(x) $ is a continuously differentiable function on $ [a,b] $. Let $ N $ be a positive integer and let $ M=\text{Max}\ \{ |f'(x)|: a\le x\le b\} $. Define $ R_N $ to be the the right endpoint Riemann Sum

Sums, integrals, and fractions

$ R_N = \sum_{n=1}^N f(a+n\Delta x)\Delta x $ where $ \Delta x = (b-a)/N $, and let $ I=\int_a^b f(x)\ dx $.

We shall prove that the error, $ E=|R_N-I| $ satisfies the estimate, $ E\le \frac{M(b-a)^2}{N} $.

Trig, dy/dx and triple integrals

$ \frac{1^5}{\sin(\pi)} $

$ \iiint_{F}^{U} x^2+y^3+\sqrt[7]{z}\, d\theta\,dr\,dz $

Matrices

$ \begin{bmatrix} 80 & a & b \\ x_3 & b^3 & \sin(\pi) \end{bmatrix} $

Multi-line Equations

You can align multi-line equations as follows.

$ \begin{align} \bar f(x) &= \oint_S g(x) dx \\ &= \int_a^b g(x) dx \\ &= \frac{\mu_0}{2 \pi a \cdot b} \end{align} $


How to fix tiny type.

Just wanted to point out that a number of one-line functions will render all tiny and ugly unless you go to "My Preferences" at the top of the page, click the "Math" tab, and select "Always render PNG." This will prevent your browser form simply showing you some formatted text instead of rendered, full-size math equations. If

$ y = 4x^2 -3x+1 $

makes you call your eye doctor, then check it out.

--Jmason 16:03, 2 October 2008 (UTC)

Thank you very much for the advice. I was wondering how to stop it from doing that!! - Gary Brizendine II


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To all math majors: "Mathematics is a wonderfully rich subject."

Dr. Paul Garrett